Technology delivers

Aside

Favorite thing of the day… Five subjects, five email strings, one friend, the power of words creating a multitude of thought, action, decision, and support exchanged.

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Decisions

I am a huge fan of the information Seth Godin shares.  He is generous with his thoughts and strategies. His marketing strategies are often relative to life experiences.  Our family is in the midst of change, making decisions and navigating best directions.  So yes, this post from Seth Godin is about market competition. And I find it a philosophical as well as practical thought offering for making daily decisions.  What do you think?  Do you see the same connection?

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2015/05/how-to-go-faster.html

How to go faster

How do you get to market faster than the competition? How do you become more efficient without violating the laws of physics? How do you save time, money and frustration?

It all comes down to decision hygiene:

1. Make decisions faster. You rarely need more time. Mostly, you must merely choose to decide. The simple test: is more time needed to gather useful data, or is more time merely a way to postpone the decision?

2. Make decisions in the right order. Do the decisions with the most expensive and time-consuming dependencies first. Don’t ask the boss to approve the photos once you’re in galleys, and don’t start driving until you’ve looked at the map.

3. Only make decisions once, unless new data gives you a profitable reason to change your mind.

4. Don’t ask everyone to help you decide. Ask the people who will either improve the decision or who have input that will make it more likely you won’t get vetoed later.

5. Triage decisions. Some decisions don’t matter. Some decisions are so unimportant that they are trumped by speed. And a few decisions are worth focusing on.

You don’t need a consultant or a lot of money to radically improve your speed to market. You will speed up once you’re comfortable going faster.

Loss Lingers and More

Our phone conversation coming to a close, she says “Happy Mother’s Day”.  I respond in kind with heartfelt measure.  Disconnecting the call, my face crumbles, and there is it. Again. Loss. Grief. Longing.  This memory recall within my center. Mom.

She feels it I know. How she is missed.  Yet it is important she continues her healing journey toward peace, on that higher plain, joined by the others that are also missed.

I then stand here and will joy and gratitude to return.

And I wish all of my sisters, aunts, nieces, cousins, friends, as mothers or as mothered, here and beyond, a heartfelt Happy Mother’s Day.

My mom and my daughter

My mom and my daughter. Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, 2000